Skinny Girl Tip of the Week: Exercise!

Skinny Girl Tip of the Week: Exercise!

This is probably the single most important tip I could give you. There are so many health benefits to exercise; it doesn’t stop at weight loss. Cardio helps you lose weight, and cardio combined with weight training really improves your metabolism, making easier to lose weight and keep it off. Exercise also boosts your immune system, is more effective at fighting depression than antidepressants, it helps pain relief, improves circulation, gives you a longer life span, and so many other benefits. I know, you’ve tried, and failed, at exercising to lose weight. This issue is close to my heart, beca…use I have a disability, making it very difficult, and sometimes impossible, to exercise. But you know what? I did it. And I got results. And if I can do it, just about anyone can. It’s difficult at first, more of a battle of the mind than anything, but YOU CAN DO IT. And if you are consistant and refuse to give up, you WILL SEE RESULTS. So make time and not excuses. Pick five or six days out of the week and just do it. Crank up the headphones, break out the stroller, and jog around the block. Stick your feet under the couch and do crunches. Hold on to your dresser and do squats. Grab a gallon of milk and do reps lifting it in the air. There are plenty of things you can do to fit exercise into your budget and schedule. JUST DO IT!

To my readers:

The above was a post I  made on a fitness Facebook page. I had to keep it short and sweet, and none of the members of that page have a disability. However, I do, as do many of you. So I would like to add to my post.

Back when my daughter was born, I could walk about as far as I wanted to. It required some extra effort, but I could do it. So I bought a treadmill and an Easy-Shaper (A fancy contraption that helps me to crunches and other ab-exercises). It was hard to do the treadmill, some days more than others, but it didn’t hurt, and I rocked it. I lost those 40 pounds after about 6 months of getting serious.

Fast forward to when my son was born a year ago, and everything hurts, all the time, and I can’t walk for 5 minutes. I had 25-30 pounds to lose, and I knew my treadmill wasn’t going to do me any good. I decided to try a stationary bike (I can’t ride a 2-wheeler for balance reasons), so a friend and I traded her bike for my treadmill. I couldn’t do the bike unless I was wearing my braces, but I could do it. Most days. So on the days I could do it, I did it as fast as I could for as long as I could. I aimed for 20 minutes twice a day, which became 10 minutes twice a day. For a while, I couldn’t do it at all. Then, last week, in an effort to lose that last bit of baby wieght, I set out to do 15 minutes, twice a day, for 11 days (until my son’s 1st birthday). I only lasted nine of those days, until I just couldn’t anymore, but I can tell it made a big difference. I’m still doing my ab exercises on my easy shaper, and eventually I’ll go back to taking it slow on the bike. All that to say… EVEN YOU CAN DO IT! You might have to modify some exercises for yourself, and there will probably be a lot of trial and error, but you can do it! If you have a doctor or therapist you see regularly, ask them to help you design a program that will work for you. And if you find some things you can’t do, DON’T GIVE UP! Keep searching, and run with the things you can do!

To my readers who do not have use of their legs, I have done some online research, and found some effective exercise ideas (even cardio!) that you can do from a wheelchair! Usually, links don’t work when I post them from my laptop, but here are the sites:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/108802-exercises-people-wheelchairs/

http://www.ehow.com/way_5518274_exercises-people-wheelchairs.html

http://www.ehow.com/video_8000390_abdominal-exercises-wheelchair.html

 

Fili-busted.

Generally speaking, I do not follow politics. Besides a few issues that are important to our family, I just don’t keep up on them. I’m busy keeping up with Dora the Explorer, how I’m going to handle a baby from a wheelchair, and the drama of second grade. If I need to know something, I call my politically savvy cousin, Shekinah. I don’t know who my state governor or Senators are (Shekinah is probably having a heart attack now), and I usually don’t know what we’re voting on until I get the ballot in the mail. I vote, and I have a good understanding of our political system due to paying attention in class, but that’s as far as it goes.

But something came to my attention the other day. As most of us have heard, Wendy Davis of Texas, recently turned to filibustering as a way of stopping a law from passing.  Now, to be honest, when I first heard about Ms. Davis, I did not know what filibustering was. So I researched it and read about it. Even then, I wasn’t sure I had it right. From what I understood, filibustering is when you take the floor and just talk. For hours on end, without stopping, as a way to stall the political process, to stop a law from passing that you do not agree with. That couldn’t be right. Permitted, recognized stalling? In the government? That’s something akin to a 6 year old distracting his parents so his friend can sneak a frog in the back door. So I called Shekinah, and I had understood correctly. Filibustering is a grown up term for stalling.

*For the record, Shekinah believes that filibusters can be a useful tool when used correctly and when necessary, and I agree with her.

The issue at hand was abortion. For the record I do not agree with abortion, and therefore do not agree with Wendy Davis, but if we look past our disagreement, there is another issue at hand.

Ms. Davis’ filibuster was objected when another senator helped her with a back brace.

Filibustering has strict rules. The rules vary for each of the 13 states that allow filibusters, but they are similar. In the state of Texas, the rules are that the senator has to stay on topic, and is not allowed to eat, drink, use the restroom, or sit or lean on a desk or chair.

“During a filibuster, a senator is limited to topics relevant to the bill being discussed and cannot eat, drink or use the restroom during the speech. The rules also prohibit sitting or leaning on a desk or chair under any circumstances when the senator has the floor and is speaking on the bill or resolution.”

Read more at the Hays Free Press http://haysfreepress.com/2013/06/26/what-are-the-rules-of-a-filibuster/#ixzz2XWbecpJ6

There are multiple things that I find wrong with these rules. And it’s not just a matter of my personal opinion; I believe they are unconstitutional. Specifically the phrase “under any circumstances”.  To start with, they don’t comply with the ADA, Americans with Disabilities Act, which states:

“The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, State and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation. It also mandates the establishment of TDD/telephone relay services.”

http://www.ada.gov/2010_regs.htm

From reading these rules of filibustering, you cannot do it from a wheelchair. If you are not able to stand for hours on end, your attempt will be unsuccessful. As of now, I don’t know of any disabled senators, but that doesn’t mean there will never be one. And we can’t wait until there is one to change this rule. If a disabled senator wanted to exercise their right to filibuster, they would have to wait for the rules to be changed. That would most likely make it too late for the Senator to filibuster the issue at hand.

I believe those are reasonable guidelines for a perfectly able bodied person. But let’s set disability aside. What about a senator with a back problem? Or a knee problem? I’m sure there are a few senators with those. It is unfair and unconstitutional that they would not have the same opportunity. Add on someone with diabetes or hypoglycemia, who can’t go many hours without eating, and I bet we’ve covered 30 percent of the senate. Not to mention the possibility of someone who has bladder or bowel problems, that isn’t able to wait to use the restroom.

I’m not saying that those rules should be done away with completely. I can see why they are a necessary element of the filibuster. What I am saying is that they should be reasonably flexible. Just as any employer would be required to make reasonable accommodations in order for me to work, the senate should be required to make reasonable accommodations to allow a senator with a medical problem to filibuster. “Under any circumstances” should not be a part of those rules.

These rules should be changed to support equality. No person’s lack of physical ability should keep them from taking part in the political process. From being allowed to fight for their beliefs. In a country where we boast about our freedom and equality, “under any circumstances” should not be a phrase found in our government policies referring to physical ability.

These are the thirteen states that currently allow filibusters:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Maine
  • Nebraska
  • South Carolina
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont

If you were a senator in one of these states, would you be physically able to filibuster under those rules?

As Shekinah would say: Quick! Call your senators!

Filibustering is a common practice at our house, too.

Filibustering is a common practice at our house, too.