Getting Fit: Skinny Girl Tips

So, my sister started this great getting fit page for moms. Just a community where friends can share their tips, ideas, successes, and frustrations. I am not overweight now, but I was after my daughter was born. Getting fit is a tough road for anyone, but having a disability adds extra challenges. But with patience and determination, I did it. I did it again after my son was born a year ago.

I did not use fad diets or expensive memberships to do it. I did it on my own, with simple diet changes and excersize. I believe that if I can do it, just about anyone can do it.

So each week on my sister’s page, I share a Skinny Girl tip of the week. Just a simple change you can make to get the weight off and keep it off. I thought I would share with you, too! Disabled or not, I think these tips can help anyone who wants to lose wieght or be healthier.

Before and after pics are soon to come!

 

Skinny Girl tip of the week:

A journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step. Right now, it may seem like you’ll never reach your goal. And in 6 months, if you don’t start now, you’ll still be the same. But what if, 6 months from now, you had a totally different body? That can happen! If you stay determined and consistent,  you could lose those 10, 20, or 40 pounds in 6 months! Just remember that there will, and should be, a few cheat days and mistakes. And don’t worry, it DOES NOT mean that you can’t eat like a normal person. Imagine yourself a totally different person by January. YOU CAN DO IT!

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Fighting Apathy: Life Worth Living

Do you ever wish you could rewind time? Unsay something; undo something? As the popular saying goes, it’s not so much the things I’ve done, but the things I haven’t done, that I regret.

Like most kids probably, when I turned 18, I was going to conquer the world.I got married, had a baby, and everyone said I couldn’t conquer the world now. I was going to prove them wrong.

But I woke up a couple years ago and realized I hadn’t proved anybody wrong. I had tried, but it seemed like every time I thought I was making the right decision, I was making the wrong one.

I got too tied up in a paycheck, and forgot about the journey. Forgot about the music and the fun. Forgot to do the things that make life worth living.

I had been able to make my own decisions for almost 9 years, and what did I have to show for it? Just stuff. A couple cars, some furniture, a good credit score. But who did I help? Where was my impact? Where was the music?

So, I decided to start making an impact. To make up for lost time. I would practice music again, volunteer at church and shelters, spend more time with friends and family. But as much as I tried, between work and other responsibilities, by the time I got a chance to do anything, I was too fatigued and in too much pain. Day in and day out, I went to work, came home, and went to bed.

When I quit my job, I had every intention of changing my path. I would play music again, volunteer for things I could do, make a difference.

But recently I realized, I wasn’t really doing any of that.

I wasn’t playing the keyboard, because I was too afraid of getting off the couch. Really. I was afraid that if I got off the couch, the pain would start. Music is my passion, but I was letting the fear of pain make me too apathetic to go after it.

My church has always needed help in the childcare department. I didn’t want to help, because I was afraid of pain. Afraid of committing and then being in pain getting ready early in the morning, and being in pain doing activities with the kids. Afraid I’d get put in the nursery, or with toddlers that I would have to carry and chase. Afraid it would end up like work, where I would have to be calling in all the time. I didn’t do much of anything because of the pain. No, it was sillier than that. I didn’t do anything because of the fear of pain.

I wasn’t really helping anyone or doing anything because I was afraid of the pain that it might cause. I was letting apathy get the best of me. What kind of a life is that?

I started to get angry. Angry that I was just sitting around all the time so I wouldn’t be in pain. Angry that I was letting fear keep me on the couch. The thing is, that’s a ridiculous plan, because I was in pain anyway.

So why shouldn’t I walk across the room and sit in the chair in front of the keyboard? Maybe it’ll hurt more. Well, it probably won’t. And then at least I’ll be doing something. And if it does, chances are it will be short lived. And then at least I’ll have done something.

And then I had this epiphany about helping out at church: I could ask to only be scheduled with school-aged children, so I wouldn’t have to carry or chase anyone. Sitting in my wheelchair talking to kids and teaching them would not be any different physically than sitting in my wheelchair listening to a sermon. And I could ask to only be scheduled at second service, so I wouldn’t have to be up and around too early. Wow. I’m a genius.

So, I’ve been playing music and teaching kids at church, and life has been a lot less boring.

In my efforts to reach out and live life, something really cool happened this weekend.

A few months ago, my brother-in-law, Ian, was diagnosed with cancer. Interestingly, it’s the same form of cancer that my uncle has. On Thursday, we stopped at their house to drop off a couple things, and we noticed they really needed yard work done. I felt kind of bad for not thinking about it before. Of course they need yard work done! He’s going through chemo, and my sister has a job and a 10 month old baby to take care of!

Right that minute I texted one of my community group leaders from church. She got a hold of the rest of my small group, and the next day we were all at my sister’s with shovels, rakes and gardening gloves. I was touched that they were willing to take a Friday night and spend hours doing yard work to help my family. As far as I was concerned, I figured I’d be spending the evening sitting on my sister’s couch while they did all the work. But when we got there, I decided to grab a shovel and see how far I got.

I was pleasantly surprised that I was able to help, and even make a dent in the work. And instead of hurting, it actually felt good to use those muscles I forgot I had. Eventually my back gave in, and I had to stop. I was fully expecting to be in a lot of pain the next day, but I wasn’t. In fact, I woke up with less pain than I have in a long time. Good Karma? Or maybe there’s something to using those muscles…

My nephew Kolby is a little light-skinned version of my son :)

My nephew Kolby is a little light-skinned version of my son 🙂

I’m so glad I decided to put the apathy away. To take the risk of being in a little more pain once in a while in order to live life; to make a difference. I can’t wait for the next opportunity.

Update: Playing my keyboard has been great. The chair we had used to hurt my back after a few minutes. By chance, we got another chair at a yard sale (the one we had had wheels; bad for a walking baby), and that chair doesn’t hurt my back. So I can play until the kids wake up without having any pain.

Childcare is going well. Usually I have someone in there to help me help the kids with their crafts. It’s a little difficult when I don’t, getting around to all the kids to help them. But there was only one day that I really had a hard time and ended up in extra pain. The rest have gone well.

My community group was able to pull all the weeds and scattered saplings out of my sister’s front yard. We will be back on Friday to do the back yard. We learned that they do have a sprinkler system installed, so they’ll be able to water it easily. Also, one of the guys in my community group works for a landscaping company. He was able to get a great deal on setting grass seed for her yard in the fall, and a year of lawn care, where all she would have to do is mow, and set it up so that there is no cost to my sister. Now that’s what church, and family, should be like.

Live with purpose.

Please don't stop the music

❤ Please don’t stop the music ❤

Coolest. Mom. Ever.

I have to admit something. Something that I have never admitted to anyone. And now I’m telling (potentially) the whole world. Ever since my daughter was born, and even before that, as a kid when I imagined having my own kids, I wondered if my disability would be a point of embarrassment for her. I wondered if it would drive us apart. If the things I couldn’t do, which were less back then, would affect our relationship. If I wouldn’t have the same opportunity to be close to my kids as I would if I didn’t have a disability.

I knew it would probably be ok until she started school. But then, maybe the questions, and probably teasing, from the other kids; mixed with the need to fit in, would turn her against me.

Or maybe. Maybe I could teach her to be different. Maybe I could teach her that everyone is different. That we’re supposed to be different, because that’s how God made us. Maybe I could teach her to be friends with the kid everyone teases. To stand up for him, even when it’s not the ‘cool’ thing to do. That people who use wheelchairs, or leg braces, or walkers are just like everyone else. Maybe I could teach her to be a leader and not a follower. Maybe she wouldn’t see me any differently than she saw the other moms.

Fast forward eight years, and it’s not as big of an issue as I worried it would be. There have been a few times when I wished I wasn’t handicap for her sake. Picking her up from school is like going back in time; all the kids staring at the girl who walks funny. I see the expression on her face and I know it bothers her. She tells me she doesn’t like when people stare because it’s rude and it might hurt my feelings. I’m glad she knows this. I’m pretty used to staring and usually I don’t let it bother me, but I’m glad she knows not to stare. Not to hurt someone else’s feelings.
And when she says she wishes she could walk or ride her skateboard to school, I have to say, “I’m sorry, but I can’t walk that far, and you can’t go alone.”

When I imagined being a mom, I imagined taking my kids camping and on hikes, helping build houses in Guatemala, or even just walking them to school. I can’t do any of that now, but I have to remind myself of the positives.

The positives are that she is friends with everyone. That she doesn’t let the way people look or what they can do determine her friendships. That she is just as good of friends with the girl in the wheelchair as she is with the one on the soccer team.

And then there are the times that she has stuck up for me. The time when they didn’t know I could hear them and her friend who had spent the night said “What’s taking your mom so long?! It’s just cereal!” and Romi said “She hurts. She’s in a lot of pain and it’s hard for her to walk. So you shouldn’t say things like that. Besides, we could get our own cereal.” Or the time when the little girl at school said “Why does your mom walk like that?” And she said “She’s right here, why don’t you ask her. She doesn’t mind.”

She’s usually surprised when I thank her. Surprised because she didn’t know I heard what they said, and surprised that I am more glad that she did the right thing than upset at what the other person said.

Needless to say, I don’t usually feel like the cool mom. When my friends are making blue pasta or spider web snacks for preschool out of pretzels and white chocolate, I can usually barely handle heating up leftovers or making a sandwich. While I would love to take them camping or to help underprivileged people in a third world country, there are times when I can’t even get off the couch to take them to the park.

But that feeling changed last weekend. Last weekend our church hosted a ‘drive-in’ movie. They were going to show the movie Cars on the big projector screen in the sanctuary, and the idea was that parents would help make cardboard cars for the kids to sit in while they watched the movie. I love a good, challenging project, and this was fun because the whole family could get in on it, and then we could have some fun watching the movie and hanging out with friends.

After finally finding some boxes the day before, we got to work. One of the boxes was big and long, so Romi decided he wanted a VW bus that she would decorate as a rock star tour bus. So I sat in a chair and directed while Sal carved out the design. Romi also decided she wanted it to be a convertible, so we had to get really creative. After about four hours, we had a convertible VW rock star tour bus, complete with license plates, working headlights and tail lights, a convertible roof, and a VW logo.

 

CardboardCar

 

I posted a picture of it on Facebook, and my cousin made the comment “Coolest. Mom. Ever.”

Seeing those words was a turning point for me. A realization of something that I already knew in theory, but hadn’t let myself really believe: Being a cool mom, a good mom, a mom that is close to my kids, didn’t have to be determined by what I couldn’t do. I could let it be determined by what I could do. Maybe I can’t spend all day creating a Martha Stewart style dinner. I might never be able to take them camping and on a hike through the woods. But you know what? I can create a pretty awesome cardboard car while sitting in a chair. I can help her find videos on YouTube so she can learn how to do the worm and spin on her head, to work toward her dream of being a rocks star/hip hop dancer. I’m one of the few moms that would let her cut her hair short and dye her bangs red and blue, and I can even help her start her own blog.

So yeah, maybe my cousin is right. Maybe I am the Coolest. Mom. Ever.

Don’t let anything be determined by what you can’t do.

*American*Hair*

Check out my kid’s first blog post!

*A*Promising*Life*

Last summer I got my hair cut short & colored. We colored it blue,(only my bangs though!) All through the school year people continued to comment on my hair until, the last day of school came & I went home. Here is a picture of my hair then:

BlueHair

But now this summer I got my hair Completely, Totally Different. Let me guess. You want to know how it’s Completely, Totally Different ? Well now, this summer, I put red in it at the top. Here is a picture of my hair now:

Blue&RedHair

The reason why I wanted my hair blue & red was because I wanted to try something new, different, & unique. You should never be afraid to try something different. My (really nice) hair dresser  Holly, did it for me. While my mom was talking to Holly, She told her that I wanted red in my hair but…

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