dis(abled)

Sometimes my disability frustrates me. Sometimes I am not as optimistic as I claim to be. Sometimes I wish it would disappear.

I don’t always feel this way. I don’t usually wish I didn’t have CP or count myself unlucky because of it. A lot of time I don’t give it much thought at all. And when I do I am able to see the benefits of it instead of the downfalls. But every once in a while, I just wish it would go away.

The past week has been a hard one. Hard to stand up, hard to sit down, hard to sleep. Hard to carry the baby, change his diaper, give him a bath. Hard to get the dishes done, or the laundry, sweep the floor. Just the thought of getting off the couch is overwhelming sometimes. Not because I’d rather sit and watch TV, but because I know it’s going to hurt more if I get up. And while most everyone would think “Okay, so just sit down and relax.” I can’t. I don’t know how. Sitting on the couch watching TV is a waste of time to me. I’d rather be living my life than just watching someone else live theirs.

I want to have an impact on the world, but sometimes I wonder how I am going to do that stuck on the couch. I don’t want to sit and relax, I want to hike mountains, run marathons, build a house with Habitat For Humanity. I’m tired of offering to help with something, and then ‘warning’ them of my physical limitations. I just want to do what I want to do, and not have to think about whether I have the ability to do it.

And for the times I really do want to just sit down because it hurts too much, usually I can’t. There’s a diaper to change or a baby to chase or dinner to make.

Sometimes it makes me bratty. Sunday, I was a brat all day and I knew it. But I couldn’t change it. I took my wheelchair into church, because we were supposed to help greet and hand out bulletins. We were late getting there (because of my pain), so they already had it covered. I was frustrated that we were late (again) and missed out on helping because of my disability.

In the service, the baby started fussing. I realized that we forgot to check him into the computer for childcare when we arrived, so my husband couldn’t just go drop him off at the nursery. The baby needed to be checked in first, but Sal didn’t know how to do it. I instantly got irritated with him for not knowing how to do it. This meant I had to do it. The reason I didn’t want to have to do it? Pain. I can’t hold a baby and wheel my chair. So I had to get up and carry him. Trying to stand up, I stumbled on the footrests of my chair, and almost fell. We were sitting near the front, so I felt like everyone saw. I needed the childcare card on the key ring, so I asked Sal for the keys. When he asked “What for?” I snapped “Just give them to me.” Because I wanted to do things quickly and not have a conversation about keys while people were trying to hear the sermon. In hindsight, it wasn’t very WWJD of me.

So I took the baby and rushed out to the foyer. At the check-in computer, it would only give me the option to check out, not check in. I thought maybe if there’s someone in the nursery that knows me well, I can leave him anyway. Buuut then I realized I left the diaper bag, with his bottle, in the sanctuary, all the way at the front. I was not about to walk all that way past all those people and back with a crying baby. I looked at the keys in my hand and decided I’d just take him to the van and nurse him. The back seat has tinted windows and screens to block the sun, so nobody can see in. I hoped that Sal would notice I left the diaper bag and come to my rescue, but he didn’t. Oh well, I needed a time out anyway.

When we were finally done, we went back inside, but everyone was coming out because the sermon was over. Sal came pushing my chair. I sat in it, and we tried to make our way through the crowd to find my daughter. He asked me a question, and when I answered, he didn’t hear me (a common occurrence when I’m in my chair). Someone else heard me and they said “What?”, so I told them that I was talking to Sal, but they didn’t hear me clearly and said “What?” again. Frustrated that nobody can hear me because I’m so far down and there are a lot of people around, I turn around to answer Sal. He had a Soda in his hand and his hand was over my sweater, so when I jerked around, his hand slipped and the soda splashed. He made a loud smacking sound with his mouth, indicating he was irritated. That hurt my feelings (again, in hindsight, he was irritated that the soda spilled, not necessarily with me). I felt like “Well, I don’t wanna be in this stupid chair where nobody can hear me, but I have to be.” So I got out of the chair and walked.

On Tuesday we stopped at the store to pick up a few things. I wanted to take my wheelchair into the store, but the baby was asleep, so we needed the stroller, which meant I would need to push the cart. For the first time, I decided to use one of the motorized scooters the store offers. That way I could sit down, and there’s a basket on the front for the items we need. I’d never used one before, because I’m always afraid I’m going to run someone over or knock down a shelf, but now I had no choice.

I was able to handle it ok without running in to anything, but all through the store I kept getting head shakes and eye rolls. I already knew why; in fact I kind of anticipated it. People see me, young and thin, and think I have no business being on that thing. That I’m just messing around, depriving some poor old lady who actually needs it. Same reason I get dirty looks in the handicap parking space. The fact is if I were 77 instead of 27, or if I were 50 pounds heavier, people would think I had the ‘right’ to use the motor cart. But I don’t ‘look’ like I need it. And kids these days just don’t respect anything.

As one gentleman stood there staring with his hands on his hips, I thought “Say something. I dare you.” Again, admittedly not the attitude I should have had. Sometimes I just get fed up. Well trust me sir, I’d rather be walking around just like you.

We went to the store again yesterday to pick up some supplies for a Relay fundraiser I’m working on. I used my wheelchair. And again when we went to the pharmacy. And you know something? I wasn’t in a whole lot of pain last night. I was able to sit on a stool and make dinner without having a breakdown about not being able to make dinner (something that’s happened every night this week. And at least once a week every week.) So it looks like the simple solution is to start using my chair when I go to the store or do other things that require a lot of walking, even if I don’t feel like I need to. I don’t like it, but it’s the smart thing to do. It will help me function better when I have to be on my feet.

So there you have it. I don’t always see my disability as a blessing in disguise. Sometimes I wish someone else had gotten it instead of me. Someone that doesn’t mind sitting on the couch all day. But I have to remember that nobody has it perfect, and we all have problems we have to contend with. This is mine, and it’s not as bad as it could be. Something good will come out of it. I can still have an effect on the world, even if I have to do it from my couch.

Sometimes it's difficult, but this face makes it totally worth it.

Sometimes it’s difficult, but this face makes it totally worth it.

5 responses to “dis(abled)

  1. About having an impact on the world. I believe you impact the world with every post you write. I know you have helped me see the world differently.

  2. As I read this post it felt like I was the one who wrote it. I am all for being positive and grateful of our abilities. Once in a while it’s so nice to rant of our frustrations.

    • Wow, that’s really cool, I’m glad you can relate. My friend Kate and I vent to each other on occasion. Nobody can quite understand like another disabled person. But once I get it out I can calm down and get things back into perspective.

  3. I understand so much more that is affecting so many young people with you being a part of the whole picture! You are a blessing:-)

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